Tuesday, December 18News That Matters

This Week in History: Medical Society forms to advance science


1868, 150 years ago

Medical society

The Medical Society of the City of Utica is organized and Dr. Charles B. Coventry is elected president. Its goals are “to advance the interests of medical science, to lessen human suffering, to maintain the honor and dignity of the profession and to encourage sociability among its members.” Coventry is the son of Dr. Alexander Coventry, one of the first physicians to settle in the area in the 1790s. (Coventry Avenue in North Utica and Deerfield is named for him.)

Charles Coventry is one of the founders of Utica State Hospital. In the early 1830s, he asked assemblymen and state senators in Albany to establish a hospital in Utica to care for the mentally ill. They did.

Other officers of the new medical society: Dr. Daniel G. Thomas, vice president; Dr. Louis A. Tourtellot, treasurer and librarian, and Dr. Edwin Hutchinson, secretary. Hutchinson is the physician-in-charge at the two-year-old St. Elizabeth Hospital on Columbia Street.

 

1918, 100 years ago

Superintendent

Catherine Davern, a graduate in 1911 of the school of nursing at St. Luke’s Hospital in Utica, is named superintendent of the Norwich Hospital. She succeeds Louis Grimm, also of Utica, who has been superintendent for three years.

 

1943, 75 years ago

Savage Arms

Capt. Clark Gable, the movie star now serving in the Army Air Corps in England during World War II, praises the Browning .50 caliber machine gun manufactured at Savage Arms in Utica. After flying five combat missions as an aerial gunner on a B-17 bomber over enemy territory in Europe, he tells reporters: “The Savage guns are the finest machine guns in the world. I fired them from the nose and waist positions at very high altitude. With enemy planes speeding at you from all points of the compass while your Flying Fortress wings toward the target, you must be quick on the trigger and your machine gun must always be in prime condition. The Savage guns behaved beautifully. That’s why we are still alive.”

 

1968, 50 years ago

Jobs, jobs, jobs

The Hiring Hall in Utica is a big success, having promoted the hiring of 144 men and women since it opened two months ago. The hall on Liberty Street, a project first suggested by leaders in the African-American community, acts as a middle man between the hard-core unemployed and area industries. Director William Berry says about 25 area firms so far have hired at least one person.

Outstanding music students from 26 high schools in Central New York perform in an all-state concert in Whitesboro Central School and among the trumpet players are: Richard Hineline of New Hartford, William Wheatley of Utica Free Academy and Michael Axel of Whitesboro.

Members of Northwoods Lodge 849 meet in the Masonic Temple in Old Forge and honor 50-year members Bernard A. Lepper of Eagle Bay and George D. MacDonald of Old Forge.

Grace Bendix and Norman Flagg are co-chairs of a concert by members of the Utica Maennerchor’s men’s and ladies’ choruses.

Dr. Joseph P. Ostrowski of Rome is elected president of the Central New York Academy of Medicine.

 

1993, 25 years ago

Thanksgiving dinner

Members of Whitesboro High’s human development classes are busy preparing desserts for the Utica Rescue Mission’s annual Thanksgiving Day dinner. Among those preparing apple and pumpkin pies, rolls and bread are Missy Thompson, Monique Poirier, Dave Battle and Beth Chapple. They’re taught by Ellen Gallagher and Drusilla Horn.

Barbara Konstantinidis scores late in the second half to lead Rome Free Academy to a 2-1 upset win over defending state champions Mahopac in a Class A field hockey tournament in Oneonta. Shannon Corigliano scores Rome’s other goal.

The Land of the Oneidas, Boy Scouts of America, honors three volunteers with the Silver Beaver Award – the highest award a Scout council can bestow upon a volunteer. They are: Michael Buckley of New Hartford, Frederick Volp of Oneida and Rosina J. Rose of Canastota.

 

2008, 10 years ago

School closing

The Rome School District decides to close the Fort Stanwix Elementary School and change Clough Elementary to a pre-K/early childhood-only building. Students at Fort Stanwix will be transferred to Louis V. Denti and Francis Bellamy elementary schools.

 

Trivia quiz

Can you identify the following five U.S. presidents? (1) he was the first to resign from the presidency, (2) he was the youngest pilot in the Navy when he won his wings, (3) he was the first president to be a U.S. citizen and not a British subject, (4) he appointed his brother as U.S. attorney general, (5) he was married twice and had eight children by his first wife and seven by his second. (Answer will appear here next week.)

Answer to last week’s question: On May 29, 1895, Herbert Hoover — 31st president of the United States from 1929 to 1933 — received an engineering degree from Stanford University in California. He was a member of the first class to graduate from the school.

This Week in History is researched and written by Frank Tomaino. Email him at ftomaino@utuicaod.com.

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